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Nodwell Indian Village PDF Print E-mail Share
Written by Jennifer Nodwell   
Tuesday, 27 January 2009 00:28

Nodwell Indian Site According to Brenda Ayres, One of William Nodwell's grandsons, Samuel, born Oct 4 1861, moved his family up to Bruce County, which is about 100 miles north of Erin, in Ontario.  He lived amongst the Indian or natives and eventually an Indian village was named after him. This is a picture, dedicated by the Province of Ontario to commemorate it.

You can visit the Plaque in Port Elgin at a park at High and Market Streets.

The Plaque reads:

This important Iroquoian village site was discovered about 1900, and named after the family which then owned the property. Subsequent archaeological examinations have uncovered a mid-14th century village, consisting of twelve longhouses, from 42 to 139 feet in length, protected by a double palisade. It was probably occupied for about 10 to 20 years by a group of some 500 people who were predecessors of the Huron and Petun Indians. Although primarily farmers who grew corn, tobacco and probably pumpkins and sunflowers, they also engaged in considerable fishing and hunting. A large number of artifacts have been retrieved from this site including fragments of pottery cooking vessels, smoking pipes, arrow heads, adzes, awls and netting needles.

 

 

 


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Last Updated on Tuesday, 27 January 2009 12:36